‘We Never Looked Back’: Ruth Wisse on the Jewish Refugees Who Built New Lives in Montreal

‘We Never Looked Back’: Ruth Wisse on the Jewish Refugees Who Built New Lives in Montreal

After their flight from Egypt, the children of Israel are doomed to spend 40 years in the desert: it takes that long for the whining and backsliding rabble to begin its transformation into a liberated people. The Bible seems to mock their trek from one watering hole to another as

Ruth R. Wisse
Ruth R. Wisse
Judaism
History Lessons from the Toronto Mob Targeting a 19th-Century Gay Icon

History Lessons from the Toronto Mob Targeting a 19th-Century Gay Icon

In 1793, Alexander Wood emigrated from Scotland to Upper Canada at the age of 21. Within seven years, he had become one of the most successful merchants in York (which eventually would grow into Toronto), a lieutenant in its militia, and a magistrate. He would eventually serve as an acting

Allan Stratton
Allan Stratton
Art and Culture
Scapegoating the Private School Boy

Scapegoating the Private School Boy

The Private School Boy is an object of endless horror and fascination. Every few years, the media outrage cycle will crest towards another scandal—a leaked video of a sexist chant, allegations of sexual misconduct or orgiastic excess—and the discourse machine will dissect the sexual mores of elite teenagers

Kasumi Borczyk
Kasumi Borczyk
Education
Noble Intentions, Counterproductive Results: The Tragic Inefficacy of a Deontological Policy Approach

Noble Intentions, Counterproductive Results: The Tragic Inefficacy of a Deontological Policy Approach

The Rittenhouse trial reminded us of what we already know: Americans are now more divided than ever. Questions of race, class, and fairness are important, but discourse on these issues tends to be vague, grandiose, and informed by generalities, abstractions, and righteous indignation. This is not helpful. To identify the

Scott Newman
Scott Newman
Zemmour’s Final Word

Zemmour’s Final Word

This year, May 5th marked the 200th anniversary of the death of Napoleon, France’s most famous historical figure and the greatest military leader of the 19th century. The response to the event was as sad as it was predictable. Bonaparte, much of the country’s Left cried, was a

RJ Smith
RJ Smith
Politics
The Sorry State of Political Apologies

The Sorry State of Political Apologies

Last summer’s George Floyd protests ignited a firestorm of political apologies that continues to blaze. Across the country, local officials from Greensboro to Glendale have been issuing formal statements of apology for historic injustices against African-Americans and other minority groups. Sad to say, most of these apologies won’t

Michael McCullough
Michael McCullough
The Push for Equity in Education Hurts Vulnerable Children the Most

The Push for Equity in Education Hurts Vulnerable Children the Most

America has always had an uneasy relationship with brilliance. Cultural tropes, like the mad scientist or the nerdy computer whiz, show both a respect for high accomplishment and an anxiety about how smart people fit into society. This cultural uneasiness is most apparent in the educational realm. Schools recognized the

Russell T. Warne
Russell T. Warne
How D.B. Cooper and the Golden Age of Air Piracy Changed Aviation Fiction

How D.B. Cooper and the Golden Age of Air Piracy Changed Aviation Fiction

Frank Sinatra's “Come Fly With Me” was the best-selling album in the United States for five weeks in 1958, but the irony of its popularity (or, perhaps, the source of its aspirational appeal) is that practically none of us could take up the offer to "glide, starry-eyed" on an aircraft

Kevin Mims
Kevin Mims
Art and Culture