John Lloyd

John Lloyd

John Lloyd is a contributing editor at the Financial Times and co-founder of the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

A Fracture Revealed, Not Healed

A Fracture Revealed, Not Healed

As the scale of her defeat in the Presidential election was announced, Marine Le Pen, leader of the Rassemblement National (RN), was quick to gloss it. “Millions of our compatriots,” she declared (in a speech that must have been prepared for weeks), “have chosen the national camp and change,” and

John Lloyd
John Lloyd
8 min read
Politics
Corrupter of the World

Corrupter of the World

The depth and breadth of corruption in countries, leaders, and peoples has gained more and more public attention in recent years, another torment to add to those already disturbing the peace of the socially aware. It is tormenting because—like the warming of the globe, the advance of authoritarianism, and

John Lloyd
John Lloyd
14 min read
Politics
Identity Mania

Identity Mania

A review of The Identity Myth by David Swift. Constable, 320 pages (June 2022). In recent decades, anxieties afflicting Western democracies have arisen from new beliefs and conflicts about how citizens relate to each other—their relative status in society, notions of mutual respect, and the patterns that the past

John Lloyd
John Lloyd
7 min read
Politics
Taiwan, Ukraine, and Huntington’s Clash of Civilisations Revisited

Taiwan, Ukraine, and Huntington’s Clash of Civilisations Revisited

An attack on Ukraine by the Russian forces massed on its eastern border would nakedly demonstrate the nature of President Vladimir Putin’s authoritarianism and, by extension, the nature of authoritarianism itself. The Russian state seeks control of Ukraine for reasons of power, and to assuage a Russian population taught

John Lloyd
John Lloyd
8 min read
Politics
Bitter Lessons from Afghanistan

Bitter Lessons from Afghanistan

A review of Can Intervention Work? by Rory Stewart and Gerald Knaus; W.W. Norton, 272 pages (August 2011) The American War in Afghanistan: A History by Carter Malkasian; OUP, 576 pages (July 2021) The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War by Craig Whitlock; Simon and Schuster, 368

John Lloyd
John Lloyd
12 min read
Review
Inflammatory Anti-Racism

Inflammatory Anti-Racism

In 2020, mid-COVID, the UK's Orwell book prize was awarded to the British writer Kate Clanchy for her memoir, Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me. It was based on Clanchy’s experience of teaching in state schools, and among her pupils had been many students of colour

John Lloyd
John Lloyd
9 min read
Free Speech
The Ear Whisperers

The Ear Whisperers

Advisors to rulers, wrote Machiavelli in his Discourses, would achieve their best results by “putting their case with moderation instead of assuming responsibility for it, and by stating one’s views dispassionately and defending them alike dispassionately and moderately—so that, if the city or prince accepts your advice, he

John Lloyd
John Lloyd
11 min read
History
Surplus to Society

Surplus to Society

Workers are scarce and wages are rising. “The relationship between American businesses and their employees,” reports the New York Times, “is undergoing a profound shift: for the first time in a generation, workers are gaining the upper hand.” In the Guardian, John Harris writes that, “

John Lloyd
John Lloyd
8 min read
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