Fiction

We Can Revisit (And Even Replace) the Classic Books We Teach Children—Without Cancelling Them

We Can Revisit (And Even Replace) the Classic Books We Teach Children—Without Cancelling Them

Earlier this month, Dr. Seuss Enterprises announced it would stop publishing six Dr. Seuss titles because they included several drawings with racial stereotypes. As the press release put it, “These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong. Ceasing sales of these books is only part of our

Allan Stratton
Allan Stratton
Books
The Dishonest and Misogynistic Hate Campaign Against J.K. Rowling

The Dishonest and Misogynistic Hate Campaign Against J.K. Rowling

When J. K. Rowling first outed herself as a gender-critical feminist, my first thought was: If Rowling can be cancelled, anyone can be cancelled. Not only is she one of the best known and best loved authors in the world (the writer of children’s books, for goodness sake), she

Louise Perry
Louise Perry
Activism
The Conservative Manifesto Buried in 'Avengers: Endgame'

The Conservative Manifesto Buried in 'Avengers: Endgame'

For the last decade or so, American cinema has exhibited a paradox: Though Hollywood has become more and more liberal, especially on issues of race and gender, Hollywood blockbusters have become more conservative—not just by recycling old plot points, as Star Wars has done, but also, in the case

Aaron Sibarium
Aaron Sibarium
Cinema
On Its 70th Anniversary, Nineteen Eighty-Four Still Feels Important and Inspiring

On Its 70th Anniversary, Nineteen Eighty-Four Still Feels Important and Inspiring

Nineteen Eighty-Four is divided into three parts, the second of which is structured around Winston Smith’s love affair with Julia, a co-worker at the Ministry of Truth. Their romance begins with Smith offering Julia the sort of smooth talk that would send any woman’s heart aflutter: “I’m

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay
Books
Headline Rhymes

Headline Rhymes

With creative endeavours these days, we need to be quite militant In portraying others’ lived experience, we can’t be too vigilant If you want to write about someone who isn’t identical to you You must get the official go-ahead from representatives of that crew The

Graham Verdon
Graham Verdon
Fiction
The Case for Nabokov

The Case for Nabokov

Vladimir Nabokov, whose 120th anniversary we mark this Spring, remains one of the 20th Century’s most acclaimed and enduring writers. He keeps turning up on various Greatest–Books lists, often more than once—for the novels Lolita and Pale Fire, as well as his autobiography, Speak, Memory. And

Cathy Young
Cathy Young
Books
Policing the Creative Imagination

Policing the Creative Imagination

At a time when activist displeasure can sweep through social media and destabilize reputations and nascent careers overnight, publishers are taking unprecedented steps in an effort to mitigate the risks. Among these is the use of sensitivity readers—individuals tasked with reading a work of fiction prior to publication in

Craig DeLancey
Craig DeLancey
Books
Michel Houellebecq: Prophet or Troll?

Michel Houellebecq: Prophet or Troll?

A review of Serotonine (French Edition), by Michel Houellebecq. French and European Publications Inc (January 3, 2019), 352 pages. Michel Houllebecq, the bestselling French novelist and provocateur, has a knack for predicting disasters. His sex-tourism novel Plateforme (2001) featured a terrorist incident at a resort in Thailand that was eerily

Jaspreet Singh Boparai
Jaspreet Singh Boparai
Art