Migration

Why Is the Society for American Archaeology Promoting Indigenous Creationism?

Why Is the Society for American Archaeology Promoting Indigenous Creationism?

In April, one of us—Elizabeth Weiss—gave a talk, titled Has Creationism Crept Back into Archaeology?, at the 86th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA). The 87-year-old SAA identifies itself as “an international organization dedicated to research about the interpretation and protection of the archaeological heritage

Elizabeth Weiss and James W. Springer
Elizabeth Weiss and James W. Springer
Anthropology
How the (Much Maligned) Mongol Horde Helped Create Russian Civilization

How the (Much Maligned) Mongol Horde Helped Create Russian Civilization

If the great nomadic regime born from the Mongol expansion of the 13th century were projected on today’s maps, it would stretch across a region occupied by Ukraine, Bulgaria, Moldavia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Russia, including Tatarstan and Crimea. The history of this Horde is therefore a

Marie Favereau
Marie Favereau
History
Masochistic Nationalism—A Review

Masochistic Nationalism—A Review

A review of Masochistic Nationalism: Multicultural Self-Hatred and the Infatuation with the Exotic by Göran Adamson. Routledge, 138 pages (March 2021). In his 1945 essay, “Notes on Nationalism,” George Orwell contrasted “positive nationalism”—pride in one’s country—with the “negative” and “transferred” nationalisms displayed by supporters

Rumy Hasan
Rumy Hasan
Identity
The Campaign to Thwart Paleogenetic Research Into North America's Indigenous Peoples

The Campaign to Thwart Paleogenetic Research Into North America's Indigenous Peoples

One of the major North American archaeological discoveries of the 20th century was made in 1967 by a bulldozer crew preparing a site for a movie theater in the small fishing village of Port au Choix (PAC), on Newfoundland’s Northern Peninsula. It was a vast, 4,000-year-old cemetery created

Bruce Bourque
Bruce Bourque
Anthropology
Do Lockdowns Work? Only If You Lock the Borders Down, Too

Do Lockdowns Work? Only If You Lock the Borders Down, Too

For almost a year, the central policy debate in most Western countries has been whether—and for how long—to impose lockdowns. Advocates of stringent lockdowns argue that measures such as stay-at-home orders and forced closures of businesses are necessary to save lives and prevent health-care systems from being overwhelmed.

Noah Carl
Noah Carl
COVID-19
Rallying to Protect Admissions Standards at America’s Best Public High School

Rallying to Protect Admissions Standards at America’s Best Public High School

This week, a group of about 200 students, parents, alumni, and concerned local residents flooded the sidewalk in front of America’s number-one-ranked public high school—Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia. This was no back-to-school event. It was a rally to save the soul

Asra Q. Nomani and Glenn Miller
Asra Q. Nomani and Glenn Miller
Activism
Don’t Listen to the Outrage. ‘Cuties’ Is a Great Film

Don’t Listen to the Outrage. ‘Cuties’ Is a Great Film

If you’d asked me a month ago what could possibly break through a news cycle dominated by the biggest global pandemic in a century, the most severe economic downturn since the Great Depression, and the worst civil unrest in the United States since the Civil Rights Era, a diverse,

Allan Stratton
Allan Stratton
Canada
The Myth of Harmonious Indigenous Conservationism

The Myth of Harmonious Indigenous Conservationism

It seems like a long time ago. But only six months ago, pundits had convinced themselves that the great morality tale of our time was playing out in an obscure part of British Columbia. Following on an internal political fight within the Wet’suwet’en First Nation over a local

Baz Edmeades
Baz Edmeades
Activism