Author: Joshua Pauling

COVID Has Forced Teachers to Confront Longstanding Problems—And Education Will Never Be the Same

The halls are eerily silent. No slamming lockers, talkative teens, or stairwell make-out sessions. Right about now, I’d gladly take a student yelling an obscenity in the hallway—even one directed at me. Or maybe even a fight to break up. Teaching this year is a lonely, ghost-town experience. In my physical in-person classrooms, I see fewer students in a whole day than I would normally teach in a single class. Visually, these spaces look like crime scenes, with caution tape delineating social-distancing sectors, and masks worn at all times. I’m told that Plexiglas dividers will soon be installed as well. I’m not here to critique the effectiveness of these measures. Rather, I’m focused on some of the lessons we’re all receiving as educators. Yes, COVID-19 is creating new problems for public schools. But it’s also exposing old ones, much as low tide shows us what debris lies under the waves. * * * Last spring, when the first round of COVID-19 lockdown orders went out, we went old-school—distributing hard-copy, distance-education “student learning packets.” As was …