All posts filed under: COVID-19 Updates

COVID-19 Science Update for March 23rd: The Wealth Paradox

The latest global data for COVID-19—updated with reports received on March 23rd, 2020—have been published at Our World in Data. Here are some of the numbers and trends that I believe deserve special attention, as well as a brief report on notable regional developments and media analyses. Since March 21st, these updates have been published at Quillette in our section marked COVID-19 UPDATES. Please report needed corrections or suggestions to jon@quillette.com. Let me start off with some good news: For the first time in a week, the daily number of new global confirmed COVID-19 deaths has dropped—from 1,690 to 1,660. That’s a small drop, but it’s important. Since I began doing these updates informally on my Facebook page, there has always been at least one country, every day, that has reported a horrifying surge in daily death rates. (The last time that the daily death rate dropped was March 16th — 17th, and even that seemed to have resulted from the previous day’s anomalous doubling of global daily fatalities, fed by an order-of-magnitude increase in …

COVID-19 Science Update for March 22nd: Grim Omens in the U.S.

The latest global data for COVID-19—updated with reports received on March 22nd, 2020—have been published at Our World in Data. Here are some of the numbers and trends that I believe deserve special attention, as well as a brief report on notable regional developments and media analyses. Since March 21, these updates have been published at Quillette in our section marked COVID-19 UPDATES. Please report needed corrections or suggestions to jon@quillette.com. Yesterday’s global tally of total confirmed cases was 305,275. This represents a daily jump of 34,047, up from the previous daily jump of 28,891. This includes: Another 6.5K cases in Italy (a slight increase from the previous daily jump); A worrying 4.9K case jump in Spain (up from the previous daily jump, which was 2.8K); And a big 7.1K increase in the United States, the biggest U.S. jump to date. These three countries account for more than half of all new cases. If you add in France (1.8K) and Germany (3.3K), you get more than two thirds of global cases. There were 1,690 new deaths reported globally. …

COVID-19 Science Update for March 21st: What Is Germany Doing Right?

The latest global data for COVID-19—updated with reports received on March 21st, 2020—have been published at Our World in Data. Here are some of the numbers and trends that I believe deserve special attention, as well as a brief report on notable regional developments and media analyses. Beginning today, these updates will be published at Quillette in our section marked COVID-19 UPDATES. Please report needed corrections or suggestions to jon@quillette.com. Yesterday’s global tally of confirmed new cases to date was 271,364. This represents a daily jump of 28,891. The previous daily jumps were, proceeding backwards, 29K, 19K, 15K, 12K, and 14K. As has been the case in recent days, the lion’s share of new cases came from just these five countries, which accounted for 74 percent of all new global confirmed cases yesterday: France (1.6K new cases, as compared to 1.9K, 1.4K, and 1.1K in the days previous) Germany (4.2K new cases, as compared to 5.9K, 1K, and 1.1K in the days previous) Italy (6K new cases, following on almost equally massive jumps of 5.3K and 4.2K) …

Conceit and Contagion: How the Virus Shocked Europe

The World Health Organization announced last week that Europe is now the epicentre of the new coronavirus epidemic. As the announcement was made, many countries in Africa and Asia were imposing strict restrictions on the arrival of flights and visitors from Europe. It felt like a great historical reversal, one full of irony. Suddenly Europeans were being kept away, they who for so long fortified their borders against all the dangers—real or imagined—arriving from the developing world. The coronavirus crisis in Europe is, before everything else, a public health crisis, but it also reflects profound changes in the way the continent sees itself. Many of these changes have been taking place for a while. Previous moments such as the debt or refugee crises can be linked with the ongoing epidemic as part of a larger pattern, but the coronavirus has made everything more visible and certainly more tragic. It seems clear to me that the extent of the outbreak in Europe is directly connected to subtle questions of cultural identity, some of which I want …