17 Search Results for: jussim

Best of the Web, October 29, 2017

Russian Revolution Centenary One Hundred Years of Insanity Paul Berman, Tablet Social Media Moral Outrage in the Digital Age M J Crocket, Nature.com Education and Free Inquiry Harvard Returns to Its Puritan Roots Jonathan Marks, Commentary Freedom of Expression on Campus: An Overview of Some Recent Surveys Eugene Volokh, Washington Post Is It Offensive to Declare a Psychological Claim Wrong? Lee Jussim, Psychology Today Kolmogorov Complicity and the Parable of Lightning Scott Alexander, SlateStarCodex Sex and Gender Why We Should Not Deny the Science of Biological Sex Differences Michael Clegg, Conatus News Parenting The Fragile Generation Jonathan Haidt and Lenore Skenazy, Reason

Best of the Web, 9 December 2017

Education: Elite colleges are making it easy for conservatives to dislike them Jack Goldsmith and Adrian Vermeule, Washington Post Free Speech, Personified Peter Salovey, New York Times  Race and Racism: The world is relying on a flawed psychological test to fight racism Olivia Goldhill, Quartz Maybe We Should Just Shut Up? Noah Rothman, Commentary A Police Killing Without a Hint of Racism Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic Women in Tech: The Empress Has No Clothes: The Dark Underbelly of Women Who Code and Google Women Techmakers Marlene Jaeckel, Medium Sexual Harassment: The Warlock Hunt Claire Berlinski, The American Interest  Is Office Romance Still Allowed? Cathy Young, Wall Street Journal  [Paywall] Science: Is Psychology a Self-Correcting Science? Lee Jussim, Psychology Today Cooperation and the evolution of hunter-gatherer storytelling Daniel Smith et al, Nature Communications Politics 100 Years. 100 Lives. Think Twice. Laura M. Nicolae, The Harvard Crimson

Best of the Web, 22nd July 2017

Culture Richard Dawkins deplatformed at a book talk in Berkeley for “abusive speech” about Islam on Twitter Jerry Coyne, Why Evolution is True Why it’s a Bad Idea to Tell Students that Words are Violence Jonathan Haidt & Greg Lukianoff, The Atlantic Aliens, Antisemitism and Academia Remi Adekoya & Landon Firm, Jacobin Science Two minds: the cognitive differences between men and women Bruce Goldman, Stanford Medicine Are we all racists deep in side? Michael Shermer, Scientific American Why Brilliant Girls Tend to Favor Non-STEM Careers Lee Jussim, Psychology Today The sex robots are coming. Do not fear them Debra Soh, The Globe and Mail Politics and foreign policy The Passion of Liu Xiaobo Perry Link, The New York Review of Books Is it racist to say Africa has civilizational problems? Remi Adekoya, Foreign Policy Russia’s Global Anti-Libertarian Crusade Cathy Young, Reason Magazine The Myths of 1953 Ray Takeyh, The Weekly Standard I’ve Worked with Refugees for Decades. Europe’s Afghan Crime Wave Is Mind-Boggling Cheryl Benard, National Interest

How a Rebellious Scientist Uncovered the Surprising Truth About Stereotypes

The Sydney Symposium At the back of a small room at Coogee Beach, Sydney, I sat watching as a psychologist I had never heard of paced the room gesticulating. His voice was loud. Over six feet tall, his presence was imposing. It was Lee Jussim. He had come to the Sydney Symposium of Social Psychology to talk about left-wing bias in social psychology. Left-wing bias, he said, was undermining his field. Graduate students were entering the field in order to change the world rather than discover truths.1 Because of this, he said, the field was riddled with flaky research and questionable theories. Jussim’s talk began with one of the most egregious examples of bias in recent years. He drew the audience’s attention to the paper: “NASA faked the moon landing – therefore (climate) science is a hoax.” The study was led by Stephan Lewandowsky, and published in Psychological Science in 2013. The paper argued that those who believed that the moon landing was a hoax also believed that climate science was a fraud. The abstract …

The Google Memo: Four Scientists Respond

Lee Jussim Lee Jussim is a professor of social psychology at Rutgers University and was a Fellow and Consulting Scholar at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (2013-15).  He has served as chair of the Psychology Department at Rutgers University and has received the Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Prize, and the APA Early Career Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology.  He has published numerous articles and chapters and edited several books on social perception, accuracy, self-fulfilling prophecies, and stereotypes. His most recent book, Social Perception and Social Reality: Why Accuracy Dominates Bias and Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, ties that work together to demonstrate that people are far more reasonable and rational, and their judgments are typically far more accurate than social psychological conventional wisdom usually acknowledges. You can follow the twitter account: @PsychRabble for updates from his lab. The author of the Google essay on issues related to diversity gets nearly all of the science and its implications exactly right. Its main points are that: 1. Neither the left nor the right gets diversity completely right; 2. The social …

Science Reformers Reduce Political Bias in Psychology

Psychology has a bigtime political diversity problem.  Psychological scientists are overwhelmingly left in their politics, and I co-edited an entire book with over 30 contributors (nearly all of whom are left in their personal politics) about ways in which that influences and distorts their “scientific” claims and conclusions.  For example, claims that advance leftist narratives, such as “the inaccuracy of stereotypes” have been advanced without any supporting data for decades.  Many other phenomena that seem to advance left narratives about the power and pervasiveness of oppression – such as stereotype threat, implicit bias, and microaggressions – have proven to be on weak or dubious empirical grounds. Can anything be done about this? Before addressing that, consider this: Psychology is in “crisis” because of a long parade of failed replications of some of psychology’s most cherished findings, especially in my home discipline of social psychology.  But scientific psychology (and many other disciplines) is plagued by more than failed replications. Widely accepted conclusions have gone wrong for a myriad of reasons, including suboptimal methods and statistics, insufficient transparency, …

My Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Statement

I Am Not Afraid of Social Justice I am not afraid of eliminating discrimination. I am not afraid of dismantling barriers to freedom, opportunity, and dignity. I welcome such dismantling. I am not afraid of welcoming women, racial or ethnic minorities, sexual orientation minorities, people who are disabled, gender non-binary, or pretty much any other manifestation of human diversity into the halls of academe, wealth, and power. On the contrary, if social justice is defined as equality of opportunity and an end to discrimination and barriers, I welcome it. Nonetheless, there are reasons to fear, not social justice, but the intolerant oppressiveness of some strains of social justice activism. Although we do not need to give in to fear, if one is to fight oppressors, one needs to first acknowledge their existence, and their power—and the very good reasons to fear them. I have a track record of standing up to intellectual mobs, and plan to continue to do so. That does not mean there is nothing to fear. I am afraid of those who will punish others for not …

Postmodern Theory Returns to Continental Europe

The infusion of much of the social science and humanities scholarship in the Anglosphere by egalitarian social justice concerns is a much-discussed phenomenon. Less often noticed is an important distinction between overtly activist disciplines such as gender and postcolonial studies, on the one hand, and disciplines that are not intrinsically militant such as education, sociology, and literature, on the other, where intellectual uniformity has nevertheless allowed for the construction of an increasingly biased, insular, and empirically dubious body of scholarship. This scholarship draws heavily from the ideas of French poststructuralism and ‘continental’ European philosophy more broadly. However, it has gained a larger influence in the United States and other anglophone countries than on the continent. It has been hypothesised that this success has been due to the unique political context of post-war America, or that the then-new poststructuralist framework developed by a handful of French writers faced much less competition because Marxism was less entrenched in American academia than in Europe. Faculty in continental Europe already overwhelming lean left in the social sciences and humanities, …

Stigmatizing Legitimate Dissent: A Response to J. Oliver Conroy

Editor’s note: this is a reply to an article published on October 29 titled Get on the Bus or Get Under It: Shouting Down Free Speech at Rutgers by J Oliver Conroy. In the spirit of constructive disagreement we have published this formal reply here, but it will also be posted at the Heterodox Academy. If you would like to join the debate please email claire@quillette.com.   Can a threat to free speech masquerade as a defense of free speech? We believe it can, if that self-styled defense denounces and stigmatizes legitimate dissent by unjustly framing it as illegitimate. Just as a false accusation of abuse or harassment can itself be a form of abuse or harassment, falsely tarring dissent as a threat to speech when it is not can itself be a threat to free speech. Unfortunately, many people seem to be highly sensitive to such threats from their political opponents and entirely tone deaf to such threats from their political compatriots. When someone on the Right condemns leftwing threats to speech, they may be correct …