All posts filed under: Editorial

Become a Patron to Receive our Weekly and Monthly Newsletters

Dear Readers, I’m excited to announce that Quillette will soon be launching a weekly and monthly newsletter for our generous patrons: Weekly Quillette Newsletter We will be featuring a short summary of the articles that we have posted on Quillette during the week so you can catch up on any articles you may have missed. Monthly Quillette Newsletter We will feature our top-read articles of the month, some of our top reader comments, ‘best of the web’ links, plus an exclusive interview with one of our writers. These newsletters will only be available to patrons, and will be sent out via the Patreon website. Automated Quillette emails from WordPress will cease, as of this week. Additionally, we are going to start posting selected articles first at Patreon so that our patrons can have early access to them. This week we have the following articles scheduled for early release: Leftist Hypocrisy about Islam and Malignant Humor: Setting the Stage for Violence, written by Jeffrey Tayler. Evergreen State and the Battle for Modernity Part 2: True Believers, Fence …

Help Support Our Fundraising Goal

Since January 2017, our traffic has been growing rapidly. We’d like your help to continue to grow, expand and keep producing quality content that is scientifically literate. We believe that this is more important than ever. Mainstream news media is tribal and polarized, and universities have cemented their own monoculture. For this reason, spaces and platforms that are committed to free and open debate are worth protecting. This year, when The Guardian and New York Times published glowing reviews of a new book disputing the biology of sex differences, Quillette published a review written by the lead author of the biggest study of brain sex differences to date. When various news sites such as Slate and Vox misrepresented the work of the social scientist Charles Murray, Quillette provided neutral analysis from two psychologists familiar with the subject area. Although we feature writing from esteemed academics, we also publish essays from students and freelance writers. And our writers gain recognition. After her essay was published on Quillette, Carrie Pritt, a freshman at Princeton, was featured in …

Help Us Build Our Platform for Free Thought

Dear reader, Quillette has been proud to offer an independent source of unorthodox commentary since November 2015. With your support we wish to increase the frequency and variety of commentary available to you. Jerry Coyne has described us “as a site you should be bookmarking. Think of it as Slate, but more serious, more intellectual, and without any Regressive Leftism.” We’ve hosted distinguished writers such as Jamie Palmer, Brian Boutwell, Jeffrey Tayler, Toni Airaksinen, Brian Earp, Cathy Young, Sumantra Maitra, W. Kevin Campbell and Heather Mac Donald. We’ve published articles on a range of challenging political issues including free speech, political correctness, Islam, immigration, feminism, foreign policy, and crime. And we’ve published a number of expert articles on scientific topics such as genetics, evolution, psychology, Bayesian statistics and technology. An open-minded readership has found Quillette and we are grateful to you for your loyalty and feedback. But we are now asking for small contributions to grow and improve the website. And we would also like your input. We would like to know what works and what doesn’t, and …

What Next After Paris?

The Paris attacks have been declared by Francois Hollande as an “act of war” by the Islamic State. The military have been mobilized, and Hollande has proposed changes to the French Constitution. This national state of emergency has occurred less than a year after the killings at Hebdo and the worldwide campaign of #JeSuisCharlie. Much has been said about the attacks that does not require repeating. Yet it is worth bearing out that the Paris attacks may indeed be an inflection point in this century’s history. One week later and the world still grieves. Many of us felt like something was burned, slashed and broken in the hours and days after we heard the news. We can all imagine ourselves at a rock concert, eating at a café, or attending a football match, having a good time. I have visited Paris only once, but my memories of the city flooded back, mixed in with the horrified knowledge that the people who were shot were just like me. We do not know to what extent the …